Lund University is a member of LERU

(League of European Research Universites)

Biomedical and Life Sciences Policy Group

Each LERU university has one/two member(s) in Biomedicine & Life Sciences Policy Group, usually the Dean of the medical school. The activities of the group are guided by a steering group.

The scope of the Biomedicine & Life sciences Policy Group will include health sciences; it will not cover other branches of life sciences such as biology (covered by the Natural Sciences Policy Group) and agriculture.

The Biomedicine & Life sciences Policy Group monitors EU policy developments with relation to biomedicine. Further the group will work with the topic Global Health, how artificial intelligence can be included in the health sciences curriculum, and when it should be taught. Other areas for discussion in 2021 include public engagement with biomedicine research and education and exchanging information on summer schools within LERU biomedicine and life sciences departments.

Activities

28 & 29 April 2021, the Deans of the LERU disciplinary policy groups (Biomedicine & Life Sciences, Natural Sciences, and the Social Sciences, Humanities & Arts) met virtually for their annual ‘joint deans meeting’. They exchanged views about the latest developments in EU research, innovation and education policies.
Topics: *State of affairs of Horizon Europe and the European Research Area (ERA); *Erasmus+, the European Education Area (EEA) and the European Universities Initiative; *Building resilience to prevent, react to, and recover from systemic shocks – such as the current pandemic. Read further on LERU.org


The Biomedicine & Life Sciences policy group have developed a position paper about the role of academia in the development of advanced therapeutic medicinal products (ATMPs) launched in September 2019.

In 2020, the group will continue work on developing a standardised final assessment test which could be used for benchmarking of an individual universities performance and for showing that a certain competence level has been reached, allowing movement of staff between countries.

The group will scope how artificial intelligence can be used in medicine and might take this forward in 2020.

Other areas for discussion in 2020 include global health, public engagement with biomedicine research and education, and exchanging information on summer schools within LERU biomedicine and life sciences departments.

The BIOM group has composed a paper that highlights how University Medical Centres and industry have complementary roles and suggests ways in which these roles can be strengthened to improve the development of new therapeutic options and patient access to these important medicinal products. Full article on LERU.org

Remit and activities: The scope of the LIF group will include health sciences and veterinary medicines; it will not cover other branches of life sciences such as biology (covered by the NAT group) and agriculture. Suggested topics by the LIF group include, amongst others: curricula and educational programme mapping; student exchange for research and exchange in residency programs; medical data (ownership, integration, storage, etc) and interactions with industry, professional societies and regulatory authorities.

Meetings: Two plenary meetings will be organised in 2017 (tbd). The steering group will meet by conference call or in person as needed.